We’ve been talking about how small businesses and filmmakers are disrupting the old Hollywood model and taking filmmaking to a whole new direction. 

 

Last week, we looked at disrupting the model using distribution. This week, we’ll take a closer look at how new filmmakers are approaching filmmaking. How and why this is disrupting the old Hollywood film model including some general tips on making your film.   

 

Hollywood Films Made Cheaper

New filmmakers and small video production teams are getting creative in how they approach filmmaking. From financing their own films by starting an equity crowdfunding campaign like New Dawn Film’s An Angry Boy to using independent distributors or online distribution channels and even marketing their own work, filmmakers are getting creative in using today’s technology. 

Thanks to new technology, films that were once made with millions of dollars in budget and production costs can now be made for less money than ever before without sacrificing quality. 

Cheap cinema-quality cameras range from entry-level pieces like the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera to high-end gadgets from premium brands like Arri and RED, are now within reach for anyone who is serious about making their film or documentary. 

Then of course, the accessibility of drones have added another layer of professionalism to the work of indie filmmakers. There was once a time when helicopters had to be rented just to get stunning aerial shots. But these days, anyone who has a great quality drone can take these shots and use the footage as part of their film or video. Drones are great because they offer a different perspective and allows the filmmaker to capture different angles and techniques.

Drone technology itself, has even come a long way since it first came out. Autonomous drone cameras are now available where once before it would mean hiring a skilled drone operator. What’s more, it’s not just the camera gear that’s changed, professional editing tools are also better than ever. In the next few years, we’re bound to see newer technology and gadgets come out, further changing how films are made not just in terms of gear but whole productions. 

 

The Result of Hollywood Disruption

Since quality films can be made for much cheaper (both by independent studios and new filmmakers) this also has an effect on much larger studios. As a result, major studios are taking to heart the “bigger is better” ethos and producing films that are essentially large spectacles. Most big studios are now only choosing to create films costing over $80 million and up, so indie-produced films and small-scale video production teams are stepping up to fill the void. Smaller film outfits can produce films with overhead as little as $500,000 to several million depending on the film they want to create.

This is good news for you as a new filmmaker or business because you can easily enter the game without requiring a huge amount of money to start. And with the current digital age, it’s easier than ever to crowdfund from film investors who trust in your capacity to create a compelling film. 

 

Quick Rules to Filmmaking

If you’re encouraged to create your own film, here are some general tips to keep in mind.  

First, it’s your film. No one else will care for your project as much as you so make sure you are devoted and willing to see it through. No matter your experience or how many films you’ve made, there will always be issues that will come up, ones you won’t expect. So it’s important to have the motivation to keep going. 

Second, double the amount of time you think you’ll finish. As mentioned, the unexpected is the norm when it comes to creating any new project. If you were planning to get things done in a year, better tack in another year in there. 

Third, your script is everything. If you have a good script and screenplay, you can expect to have a good film. 

Fourth, if there are things you don’t know how to do, hire an expert or delegate it to someone who does. When you’re an independent filmmaker, it’s easy to try and take on all the tasks yourself. You might even think you can just “learn” whatever it is and do a “good enough” job. But if you’re serious about making this film the best possible, set aside your ego and hire someone who knows what they’re doing. 

Finally, have fun while creating your film. The main point you’re bothering to create a film in the first place is because it’s your passion. It should be fun, challenging and entertaining for you. Don’t just care about the end result but also the process. 

 

Aside from these basics, also consider your film financing, production schedule, post-production process, marketing and distribution options. 

 

Come back next week for Part 3 of Disrupting the Hollywood Model where we’ll take a look at Marketing. 

 

In the meantime, craving for terrifying mysteries? Head over to our Scary Mysteries Channel over at YouTube. We’ve been creating quality content for all of you mystery lovers.